Tapping the Talents of Enzymes

Tapping the Talents of Enzymes

BTI researchers are working to discover, understand, and improve our ability to enlist the help of molecules that catalyze life.

by Mary Hoff

Enzymes are the movers and shakers of the biomolecular world. A class of proteins found in every cell of every living thing, they bring together molecules that would otherwise be reluctant to interact so they can combine, exchange parts, or otherwise alter each other.

In nature, enzymes facilitate thousands of processes from photosynthesis to decomposition. Enzymes speed up chemical reactions thousands of times faster than the reactions would occur on their own. Over the millennia, humans have found ways apply this superpower to accomplish a variety of useful goals from making beer and cheese, to making our laundry whiter and brighter, to cranking out millions of copies of a sample of DNA to solve crimes or find long-lost relatives.

“And that’s just the beginning,” says Romas Kazlauskas, professor in the department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics. “Enzymes can also learn how to do different things. We’re trying to figure out which parts are important and why they’re important, then design something different to do a reaction that doesn’t occur naturally.” By identifying enzymes, improving understanding of how they work, and applying them to new tasks, Kazlauskas and BTI colleagues are taking advantage of the billions of years of evolution that produced these molecules to make medicines, degrade pollutants, speed industrial processes, and more.

 

Trash to Treasure Kazlauskas is working with an enzyme found in nature that degrades PET plastic. First synthesized in the 1940s, PET (a form of polyethylene) is widely used for beverage and food containers with some 70 million tons generated every year—and much of that ending up in landfills and the ocean. Current efforts to recycle the material can only produce lower-quality plastics.

“One idea is to break down to component parts and resynthesize fresh plastic that would be just as good as what you started with,” he says.

Sound like a job for an enzyme? Kazlauskas thought so, too. But the likelihood of finding a suitable one in nature was slim because PET didn’t exist for most of evolutionary history. Nevertheless, in a compost heap in Japan, researchers recently found an enzyme that bacteria use to break down the waxy part of plants that could also break down PET.

Kazlauskas, along with graduate student Colin Pierce and colleagues, is working on modifying that enzyme known as cutinase, to improve its ability to degrade PET. The goal, ultimately, is to be able to develop a commercially viable way to turn old PET into new plastics without experiencing the loss of quality. This would not only reduce the load of plastic waste, it would also reduce pressure to produce more plastic, often from fossil fuels.

Kazlauskas sees huge opportunities beyond PET for efforts to extend nature’s ability to degrade compounds. “There are a lot of cases where we start making stuff and putting it out in nature, and people say it doesn’t degrade,” he says. “We’re finding bugs that can degrade these forever chemicals.” he says. By advancing the ability to modify such natural enzymes to make them do the job even better, the hope is to avoid the buildup of undesirable, manufactured compounds in the environment and reduce the need to make more from raw materials.

 

Life on the Edge

Turning somersaults in a sulfurous hot spring or clinging tenaciously to life on a glacier, the organisms studied by McKnight Presidential Fellow Trinity Hamilton, associate professor in the department of Plant and Microbial Biology, are the stars in microscopic world’s version of “Survivor.” Having evolved within living things, most enzymes work best under fairly mild conditions with respect to things like temperature and acidity. But not all. In the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, Hamilton is studying how microbes—and the enzymes they use to carry out the activities of daily life—can survive regular temperature fluctuations of 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit) or more. And, on the other end of the spectrum, she’s also looking at how other microorganisms that live on ice maintain their function at low temperatures in the absence of liquid water.

Hamilton studies, among other things, enzymes that facilitate photosynthesis and function well up to 72 degrees Celsius, and then suddenly quit. “We have no idea why,” she says. “It’s really hard to perform autopsies on microbes.”

The ability of bacterial enzymes to function at various temperatures is behind the process that makes it possible to sequence DNA using what is called the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The enzyme used for this was isolated from bacteria in a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. A better understanding of how bacteria keep these proteins active under extreme conditions could open the door to advancing our ability to solve other human challenges like preserving food or thriving in the face of climate change.

Molecular Assembly Line 

For Michael Smanski, a McKnight land grant professor in the department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics, the focus is on bringing together enzymes from different sources to create an efficient work team that can produce a specific molecule.

Most recently he’s been focusing on serofendic acid, a molecule found in the blood of fetal calves. In the early 2000s, researchers in Japan discovered that serofendic acid could prevent the untimely death of neurons and potentially serve as a therapy for minimizing damage from Parkinson’s disease, strokes, and other neurological trauma. The problem? It occurs in such small quantities that it would take 1,000 calves to make a minute 3 milligrams of active substance—providing dismal prospects for practical use.

Biosynthesis and enzymes to the rescue. Using databases describing enzymes from different organisms and the type of work each does, Smanski and colleagues designed a molecular assembly line that could make serofendic acid from readily available feedstock chemicals. Then they introduced the corresponding genes into a bacterium, enabling it to make the desired product.

As any industrial engineer would know, populating an assembly line with ready workers is only part of the solution, however. For efficiency’s sake, it’s also important to have the right capacity at every step of an assembly process to ensure that partially made products don’t pile up, or a slow step doesn’t drag down everything else. To optimize production of serofendic acid, Smanski has been tweaking the activity levels of the various enzymes relative to each other.

Even as he’s working on a strategy to improve outcomes for individuals with brain disorders, Smanski is also discovering principles that can be applied more broadly to optimizing artificial biosynthetic processes.

Optimizing a process means testing multiple levels of expression for the specific gene that’s coding for each enzyme along the way. If the assembly line consists of 15 enzymes, and researchers want to test five levels of expression for each, that would require 5 15 power—more than 30 billion—individual trials. Using combinatorial mathematics, Smanski is devising a strategy for selecting from those millions of possibilities, a mere 100 or so that are most likely to succeed, making the optimization process far more manageable.

“As improvements in the technical aspects of genetic engineering make it easier to rewrite the genetic blueprints of living organisms, learning how to efficiently sift through all of the possibilities of what-to-write is becoming more important,” Smanski says. “We think that our work at the interface of combinatorial mathematics and genetic engineering will benefit any application that requires more than one or a few genes working together.”

 

Self-Assembling Scaffold

Bringing multiple enzymes together in an assembly line is far more easily said than done. The molecules involved in sequential steps must be physically located close enough to each other to be able to pass a product-in-the-making down the line. They also must be positioned correctly at their stations so they can accomplish their task.

Distinguished McKnight University Professor Claudia Schmidt-Dannert is on it. Rather than identifying enzymes to string together to accomplish a molecule-making task, she is working on the assembly line itself.

Her goal is to not only design a stable assembly line of enzymes able to make a useful product but to genetically modify a microorganism—say, the bacterium E. coli—so that it can produce it on its own. Such a self-assembling scaffold, she believes, could dramatically improve the function of molecular assembly lines, reducing the cost of producing pharmaceuticals and other useful products.

“If we stabilize enzymes, we can make reactions more efficient,” she says.

Schmidt-Dannert and colleagues recently received a patent for a self-assembling, modular scaffold that co-locates enzymes in a way that enhances their ability to efficiently produce desired molecules. Her current focus is on developing scaffolds as materials that can correctly self-assemble into 3-dimensional architectures to organize and support enzyme functions. This would allow the manufacture of a broad range of chemicals including pharmaceutically active molecules—a process that can be extremely difficult using conventional chemical synthesis methods. 

She’s also applying her strategy to making molecular assembly lines more economical by including enzymes that recycle required co-factors, which are molecules or metals that assist enzymes in assembling a molecular product.

“You need to recycle the [co-factors]. Otherwise, the process is too expensive,” she says. “A scaffold helps make that possible.”

 

Jen Kalaidis-Meslow

Jen Kalaidis-Meslow

Jen Kalaidis-Meslow

Administrative Manager

kalai004@umn.edu

Fiscal strategic support for departmental budgets, MN Drive initiatives, administrative reports, and day-to-day operations of the PMB, BTI, and EEB administrative cluster.

Jen Kalaidis-Meslow is the Administrative Manager for the St. Paul Administrative Cluster at the College of Biological Sciences. Her commitment to environmentalism and sustainability brought her to CBS after having spent the last few years living and working in Los Angeles. As a new Twin Cities resident, Jen enjoys exploring the local bike trails, lakes, and restaurants the metro area has to offer. An avid traveler, she enjoys visiting new locations, both near and far, and hopes to one day visit all seven continents.

About BTI

About BTI

About BTI

The BioTechnology Institute (BTI) provides advanced research, training, and industry interaction in biological process technology, a major area of biotechnology research. The Institute is the central University of Minnesota vehicle for coordinated research in the biological, chemical, and engineering aspects of biotechnology and home to the MnDRIVE Environment Initiative 

Innovative Research

BTI faculty conduct research over a broad spectrum of disciplines including microbial physiology, metabolic pathway engineering, genetics and cell biology, functional genomics, animal cell culture, biodegradation of hazardous materials, molecular evolution, biological diversity, green chemistry, natural product synthesis, protein engineering, and the development of biofuels and biopolymers from renewable resources.

Professional Training

Since 1990, the Institute has been the recipient of the prestigious NIH Training Grant in Biotechnology. This grant has provided financial support to graduate students completing degrees in biochemistry, microbiology, chemical engineering, chemistry, genetics, computer science, biomedical engineering, plant sciences, mathematics, health informatics, and electrical engineering. Many of these students have gone on to complete a PhD. 

Reflecting its cross-disciplinary nature, the Institute offers a Master of Science degree in Microbial Engineering. This program is favorably regarded by industry as a source of highly trained individuals familiar with both the biological sciences and engineering.

A Resource for Industry

In addition to the faculty laboratories, the Institute has established the Biotechnology Resource Center (BRC); a process scale pilot plant unique in the state and accessible to industrial and academic scientists for collaborative and contract research. The BioTechnology Institute also coordinates an active industrial outreach program that sponsors short courses and mini-symposia.

Biotechnology Resource Center
Visual Science

Visual Science

Depth of Field Photo Contest Banner Image

Depth of Field: BTI’s summer research photo contest

The summer research season is around the corner. Help us celebrate and document your work in the lab or the field by entering BTI’s summer research photo contest. Whether it’s a close up of your favorite cell culture, or a portrait of a colleague hard at work, we’re looking for photos that represent the breadth of activities in BTI labs. So unleash your creativity and tweet your images @BTI_UMN with the hashtag #visualscience. And don’t forget to email us a copy of your entry as well to bticom@umn.edu. We’re awarding prizes in five categories and will host a reception for winning photos this fall. 

So take out your Digital SLR or Smartphone and show us your stuff. Get a better shot? Enter again! The number of entries is unlimited. See instructions below and good luck!

How to Enter

  1. Tweet your entry @BTI_UMN with the hashtag #visualscience
  2. Send a high resolution copy (at least 1024×768, such as from a smartphone or digital camera) to bticom@umn.edu. Include your name, lab, a location, date and brief description of the image. Let us know what alterations (if any) you made to the photo.

How will photos be judged?

  • Photos are submitted to BTI Communications and collected. Photos must be submitted between June 1, 2022 and September 5, 2022 (Labor Day). 
  • Photos chosen for the exhibition will be printed and displayed at a reception this fall.
  • Awards will be given in five categories:
    • The people’s choice award will be given to the image with the highest number of likes on Twitter.
    • The best photo story will be judged by the Science Communication Lab and awarded to the best sequence of images telling a research story.
    • Two Director’s choice winners will be awarded by BTI Director Claudia Schmidt-Dannert for the best faculty photo and the best photo by a postdoc or graduate student.
    • An on-site people’s choice award will be given to the image receiving the highest number of votes at the presentation gallery this fal

To be eligible to win:

  • Be an undergraduate student, graduate student, postdoc, or faculty member in a BTI lab.
  • Follow all contest instructions.
  • Photos must be taken and submitted between June 1, 2022 and September 5, 2022 (Labor Day).

FAQ

Can I enter more than once?
Yes! The number of entries is unlimited.

Do I have to be on Twitter? 
Yes. We’re seeking photos to publicize BTI and increase our Twitter presence.

What happens if two different photos get the same number of votes?
The prize will be split between the two winners.

 

Disclaimers

  • The BioTechnology Institute retains the right to use any photos you enter in the contest for online and print marketing materials.
  • Please keep your photos and captions “safe for work.” No lewdness or profanity, please.
  • We retain the right to remove entries that break this rule.
A Helpful Fungus Among Us

A Helpful Fungus Among Us

Mine wastewater bioremediation on Minnesota’s Iron Range

By Evan Whiting

When people think of fungi, they typically conjure images of mushrooms: portobellos, oysters, truffles, or shiitakes. But a mushroom—the fruiting body we see above ground—is merely the tip of the iceberg when it comes to fungi. Most fungi are comprised of a tangled network of small thread-like structures called hyphae. Others, like yeasts, are microscopic, consisting only of single cells.

In fact, there is a huge diversity of fungi out there—some experts estimate that there are over two million species of fungi living on Earth today. And they’re important members of modern ecosystems. Excellent scavengers and nutrient recyclers, many fungi also gather materials from their surroundings and can even capture and store environmental contaminants. Experts are actively working to understand the underlying mechanisms, but scientists, engineers, and industry professionals also see the potential for using fungi in bioremediation—the cleanup of environmental contaminants or pollutants using living organisms, usually microbes.

Dr. Cara Santelli, an associate professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences and a member of the University of Minnesota Biotechnology Institute, is an expert on bioremediation and the interface between microbes and minerals. Santelli and her colleagues investigate organisms with the potential for bioremediation of mining waste, including several species of fungi. One of her ongoing projects, funded by MnDRIVE Environment, involves a species of fungus native to northern Minnesota’s Iron Range, where high concentrations of metals in the wastewater from an inactive underground iron mine could, if left untreated, threaten ecosystems and natural resources on the surface.

Located near Lake Vermilion and the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, the Soudan Iron Mine was once a prolific source of iron ore. In the 1960s, when mining operations shut down, the mine became a research and educational facility. But more than fifty years later, there are still lingering issues with toxic metals in the mine’s wastewater, which is currently treated with expensive ion-exchange filters. Luckily, there may be a cheaper, local, and ‘organic’ solution to this problem: bioremediation with a native species of fungus (Periconia sp.) that grows in the salty, metal-rich waters in the depths of the Soudan Mine. Periconia is capable of producing manganese oxide minerals that incorporate metal ions in their chemical structures, much like blocks in a microscopic game of Tetris.

Dr. Brandy Stewart, a postdoctoral researcher in the Santelli Lab, has been studying this fungal bioremediation system in detail. Stewart is an expert in biogeochemistry, or the interplay between chemicals, microbes, and their environment. With additional background in environmental consulting, she brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to this new project. Currently, Stewart studies the optimal growth conditions for the project’s focal fungus, as well as how efficiently it produces manganese oxide minerals using nearby metal ions from the surrounding brine.

The fungus needs a cocktail of nutrients to grow and remain healthy, but the actual wastewater from the mine might not be the ideal growth medium. Even for this mighty fungus, certain metals, like copper, can be toxic at higher concentrations, so Stewart has set out to facilitate the removal of these metals without hurting the fungus itself. She likens this to our own dietary choices: “If you ate nothing but doughnuts, you probably wouldn’t be very healthy, but if you ate well and got plenty of fruits and veggies most of the time, you could still have a doughnut every once in a while and be okay.”

Thankfully, the fungus seems to grow quite well in the suboptimal, mine-like conditions simulated in the laboratory, especially when grown in the presence of carpet fibers. These fibers may be acting as a sort of ‘scaffolding’ upon which the fungus can grow, or even as an additional food source for the fungus. Regardless, Stewart has found that the presence of carpet fibers dramatically improves the growth and productivity of the fungus, which creates a thick biofilm where the manganese oxide minerals form and accumulate . As revealed by X-ray fluorescence images, these minerals are often laden with captured metals, demonstrating the efficiency of this system for removing metals from wastewater.

 

Periconia sp

X-ray fluorescence imagery showing very similar groupings of manganese oxide minerals (left) and copper ions (right) along strands of Periconia sp. fungal hyphae growing in the lab. Courtesy of Brandy Stewart, UMN.

Although still in the experimental stages, Santelli and Stewart eventually hope to build larger bioreactors to scale up their fungal bioremediation system for applications in the Soudan Mine. These bioreactors may be able to help prolong the lifespans of the ion-exchange filters already in use—or potentially replace them, if they prove to be at least as effective at removing metals like copper, cobalt, and nickel from the mine’s wastewater. These metals are not just potential environmental contaminants; they’re also economically important for myriad purposes, including electronics and battery production. If enough of these metals could be efficiently captured in manganese oxides produced by fungi and later recovered, we could potentially capitalize on them.

And mining wastewater might be just the beginning, according to Santelli. There are large amounts of dissolved solids in many types of industrial wastewaters, so there is great potential for using fungi (and/or other microbes) for bioremediation of contaminants in wastewaters well beyond the Iron Range. With such a huge diversity of fungi out there, it’s only a matter of time until another helpful fungus among us becomes the next big hit in bioremediation.

Evan Whiting is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Minnesota and an affiliate writer in the University of Minnesota Science Communication Lab. He can be reached at whiti101@umn.edu.

Feature photo: Photomicrograph of Periconia sp. fungal hyphae. Courtesy of Brandy Stewart, UMN

Kate Adamala

Kate Adamala

KATE ADAMALA

Assistant Professor
Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development

kadamala@umn.edu
protobiology.org

Research Interests

Synthetic cells, Cell-free protein expression, Engineering genetic pathways

Bio

Kate Adamala is a biochemist whose research focuses around building synthetic cells. Her lab studies the origin and early evolution of life, explores possibilities of using synthetic biology to colonize space, and aims to shape the future of biotechnology and medicine. The lab’s research utilizes synthetic cell technologies to make tools for metabolic engineering, drug development, and biosensing.

Harnessing Microbes for Better Health

Harnessing Microbes for Better Health

UMN researchers study how bacteria can contribute to safer drinking water

By Shayna Korol and Charlie Kidder

Clean water doesn’t happen by accident. Before it is ready to drink, water must be purified of microbes and other pollutants that are harmful to human health. Most drinking water in the United States is treated through biofiltration, a process that uses filter media, such as sand, anthracite coal, or granular activated carbon (GAC), with attached communities of bacteria to remove harmful microorganisms as well as dissolved contaminants. It seems counterintuitive to cultivate bacteria in a drinking water treatment facility, but it is important to realize that not all bacteria are harmful. In fact, many bacteria are beneficial and can be utilized to improve water quality. 

Biofilters use a granular filter medium such as sand, which is covered with a thin bacterial layer known as a biofilm. As untreated water passes through the biofilter, the grains of filter medium collect the microorganisms and other particles from the incoming water while the biofilm “catches” dissolved pollutants, including nutrients and organic contaminants like pesticides. While water treatment never completely eliminates microbes, biofiltration aims to keep the concentration of harmful pathogens low enough to prevent people from getting sick. 

Not all biofilters are created equal. Some biofilters that use sand as a filter medium are known as slow sand filters. As the name suggests, these filters work relatively slowly, making it difficult for an urban water treatment facility (like the city of Saint Paul’s) to process 50 million gallons a day. Tim LaPara and Ray Hozalski, University of Minnesota professors in the department of Civil, Environmental, and Geo-Engineering and the BioTechnology Institute, study differences between biofilters that can impact water quality. “The slow sand filters don’t work well [for large metropolitan areas like the Twin Cities],” says LaPara. Water treatment plants for large cities typically employ “rapid filters”, which process water at a rate that is more than 10 times greater than slow sand filters. Hence, the number of filters needed is much more manageable, and the plant size is reasonable.

In the early 2000s, Saint Paul had a water quality issue because of a substance called geosmin. Although it is not harmful to human health, geosmin has an unpleasant taste and odor. In order to mitigate geosmin’s effects on the water supply – and cut down on hundreds of yearly complaints from Saint Paul residents – the city installed granular activated carbon (GAC) filters. “The idea was the geosmin would stick to those filters, and water would taste better,” says LaPara. 

In Saint Paul, water quality complaints plummeted by about 90 percent after the GAC filters were put in place. “They went from 250 to 300 complaints down to 15 to 30 complaints per year,” says LaPara, a tremendously low number for a city as big as Saint Paul. 

Like Brita water filters in kitchens across the world, the thought was that the GAC filters would eventually have to be replaced. Implementing the filters cost $5 million, and removing and replacing them would cost the city another $5 million each time. Hozalski estimated that the filters would work for at least five years. Surprisingly, the filters kept working well even after five years. Instead of simply accumulating on the GAC filters as the researchers assumed would eventually happen, the geosmin also was being consumed by the bacterial communities on the biofilm as it passed through the filter. The GAC “takes up all the geosmin during the summer and then slowly dissolves it out the rest of the year, and it dissolves it so slow[ly] that the microbes eat it and nobody ever taste[s it],” explains LaPara. Ten years passed, and the researchers found that the filters worked as well as they did the day they were installed. Thus, the GAC filter media was being bioregenerated, allowing for a sustainable treatment process.

“If the bacteria can biodegrade the compounds [that need to be removed], then you don’t have to replace the media because they can basically take care of it naturally,” says Hozaski. The work by the bacteria on the filters provided millions of dollars in savings. 

As an outgrowth of the GAC filter research that began in the early 2000s, the scientists attempted to understand how the microbial communities in these biofilters evolve and function. In a 2018 journal article, Ph.D. student Ben Ma, together with Hozalski and Prof. Bill Arnold, demonstrated that biofilters can remove a wide variety of trace organic contaminants, including pesticides and pharmaceuticals. Hozalski also lead a study by a research team, which included Ma, LaPara, and Ashley N. Evans from the consulting firm Arcadis, in which samples of filter media were collected from biofilters throughout North America. The researchers found that the microbiome of drinking water biofilters is affected by both environmental factors and filter design. 

They published the basic science study in FEMS Microbiology Ecology. “We were trying to understand how different these biofilters are from location to location,” LaPara says. While Minneapolis filters are very similar to Saint Paul filters, they are different from filters in California. 

“Geographic location seems to have some bearing on the [microbial] communities that evolve, and so the closer that water plants are together, the more similar the communities are; the further they are apart, the more different,” Hozalski explains.  

In 2020, the researchers published a paper in Environmental Science & Technology investigating the effects of biofilter design on both the microbiome of the filter media and filtered water itself. This study, also an extension of the earlier GAC filter research, used GAC-sand and anthracite-sand biofilters. Hozalski also served as lead researcher.

While the biofilters reduced bacterial abundance in the water by about 70 percent, they did not significantly affect the microbial composition that remained in the filtered water. These results suggest the biofilms mostly affect water quality by removing pollutants and nutrients rather than changing the microbial composition of the filtered water. “The biofilter does a lot, but it doesn’t add different microbes to our water,” LaPara says.

By shedding further light on how biofilters function, the researchers are setting the groundwork for better filters – and cleaner water. Hozalski said, “I have been working on biofilters since my Ph.D. studies in the early 1990s, and I still have a lot to learn! They are both simple in design yet decidedly complex when you dig into them.”

Byproduct

Byproduct

Byproduct

Byproduct

Art installation at the Fulton brewery taproom sheds light on MnDRIVE sponsored sustainable wastewater treatment research.

Byproduct, a new site-specific installation by artist Aaron Dysart, opens at the Fulton Brewery Taproom on September 23 and runs through October 23, 2021. Byproduct will carbonate the façade of the taproom with shifting colors generated from an enormous mirror ball. The colors display data from a sustainable wastewater research project conducted by Paige Novak and her team at the University of Minnesota.

We often overlook the carbon dioxide bubbles drifting up the sides of a pint glass gathering to head. On the one hand, they are just a byproduct of a yeast cell. On the other hand, they are a refreshing grounding in the present moment— and the beer just doesn’t taste right without them. In Byproduct, Dysart uses this visual language of carbonation to speak to innovative research underway at Fulton’s brewery. The installation, which displays some of the team’s data as colorful ‘bubbles’ on the taproom facade, celebrates the continuing push to make the world a better place.

Manufacturing creates waste, and brewing beer is no different. Not only does brewing generate a high volume of wastewater, but this wastewater is also full of carbon-containing compounds that require a lot of energy to treat using standard technology. However, other treatment options operate differently, using bacteria to make energy instead of using energy during wastewater treatment.  

Novak and her team are working on a treatment technology for small to mid-size industries that generates energy (in the form of methane gas) and removes carbon-containing compounds. The collaboration with Dysart allowed the team to share their research with the public as they test their scalable process that treats wastewater onsite while making energy for use at the brewery.

Dysart’s installation presents two colorful light shows comparing the two treatment methods set up side-by-side, treating wastewater at the Fulton Brewery. The first compares the amount of usable energy produced by the Novak lab’s experimental technology with the existing system, which works well but is high-maintenance, energy-intensive, and expensive to use. The second explores the reduction of carbon-containing waste compounds realized through the pilot at Fulton’s brewery. 


 

Aaron Dysart is a sculptor who is interested in using visual language and spectacle to give hidden stories a broader audience. His environmental interventions showcase his love of light shows, fog machines, and data, while his objects showcase his love of a material’s ability to carry content. He has received awards from Franconia Sculpture Park, Forecast Public Art, The Knight Foundation, and The Minnesota State Arts Board, and his work has been in Art in America Magazine, Hyperallergic, Berlin Art Link, and other publications. He has shown nationally and partnered with local and national organizations including the National Park Service, Army Corp of Engineers, NorthernLights.mn, and Mississippi Park Connection. Aaron is currently a City Artist through Public Art Saint Paul. He is embedded in the city of St. Paul, and operates his studio in northeast Minneapolis.

Paige Novak is a professor and the Joseph T. and Rose S. Ling Chair in Environmental Engineering in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geo- Engineering at the University of Minnesota. Among other projects, Novak and her team are working on the development of a new type of treatment technology that relies on the encapsulation of bacteria into small, gel-like beads that can be easily deployed and retained—perfect for use at small industries such as craft breweries. This technology treats the waste, and in the process, generates energy in the form of methane gas that can be used on-site. For Dysart and Novak’s collaborative project, funded by the MnDRIVE: Environment Initiative at the University of Minnesota, Novak deployed a small pilot-scale system using these encapsulated bacteria at the Fulton brewery to treat their wastewater in real time, comparing it to a much more operationally and energy-intensive treatment technology. 

Bill Arnold and Natasha Wright were collaborators in the research. Kuang Zhu, Siming Chen, and Olutooni Ajayi also worked on the project

Byproduct is funded by a McKnight Project Grant through Forecast Public Art, and a MnDRIVE: Environment Demonstration Grant through the University of Minnesota.

Photo: Aaron Dysaart © 2021

 

 

The National Microbiome Data Collaborative

The National Microbiome Data Collaborative (NMDC) team is building an integrated data science ecosystem that leverages existing data standards, data resources, and infrastructure in the microbiome research space. The NMDC is launching the NMDC Ambassador program to provide training and support for early career researchers who are motivated to engage with their respective research communities to lower barriers to adoption of metadata standards.

We invite applications from early career leaders who are:

  • Familiar with the challenges of discovering, accessing, and reusing microbiome data

  • Committed to working with the NMDC to make microbiome data findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR)

  • Motivated to engage with researchers in their community

  • Committed to inclusion, diversity, equity, and accountability (IDEA)

Please encourage qualified early career researchers to apply by May 21, 2021. For more details about the program, visit: microbiomedata.org/community/ambassadors or email us at support@microbiomedata.org.